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What is SARS-CoV-2?

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the name given by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) to the virus responsible for causing the disease, COVID-19.

How much space do I need to store the tests?

One box contains 25 tests, and measures 20cm (L) x 21cm (W) x 8cm (H).

The space required depends on how many tests you require at any given time. However, as the KnowNowᵀᴹ Tests can be stored at any temperature between 2 and 30 degrees, special storage facilities should not be required in the UK, unless there is unusually hot weather.

Are there any health risks to or side effects from taking the KnowNowᵀᴹ Test?ᵀ

There are no health risks associated with using the KnowNow test itself, and it is safe to use on all individuals.

Receiving a negative result means that the individual tested does not have any live virus in the sample provided and is not currently infectious to others. However, it's important to be aware that they could still be exposed to the SARS-CoV-2 virus following the test. It could also be possible that the individual tested has already been exposed to the virus 1 or 2 days ago, and they have not yet become infectious to others.

As a result, we recommend that individuals are tested as regularly as possible to keep workplaces and communities safe. Depending on the scenario, we would recommend testing is repeated every 1 to 3 days.

If this regular testing is combined with mask wearing, hand washing and social distancing, the risk of virus transmission is vastly decreased.

How sensitive is the KnowNowᵀᴹ Test?

What’s important when it comes to sensitivity is how much virus needs to be present in the patient sample for the test to give a positive signal. This is known as the 'Limit of Detection', and we measure this rather than clinical sensitivity as it is much more informative.

Our Limit of Detection is between 50,000 and 200,000 viral copies per mL, making our test more sensitive than other rapid antigen tests available. The Abbott BinaxNow test, for example, needs 1,000,000 viral copies per mL in order to get a positive signal.

The KnowNowᵀᴹ Test's low Limit of Detection means it can detect infected people as early as day 3 to 4 of infection. This is before they become highly infectious, and a day or two earlier than most tests available (based on models of viral load in disease progression).

If you'd like to read more about this subject, we recommend reading this paper. It argues that the "Limit of Detection matters and directly impacts efforts to identify, control, and contain outbreaks during this pandemic" since "higher LoD are likely to miss nonnegligible fractions of infected individuals." It also makes the case that Limit of Detection values for tests using universal standard metrics should be readily available in the public domain to enable like-for-like comparison.

Why do you need my company email to activate my sample pack?

So that we adhere to the strict rules around lateral flow tests, we have to make sure that anyone activating a sample pack is doing so purely to learn more about KnowNow Testing, and not as means of administering a clinical test.

What does a positive test result look like and mean?

Positive KnowNowᵀᴹ Test result
Positive KnowNowᵀᴹ Test Result

If there is one red line visible next to the "C" in the KnowNowᵀᴹ device test results window, and any line at all, no matter how faint, appears next to the "T", then the test result is positive. This indicates that the SARS-CoV-2 antigen has been detected in the sample.

Following a positive result, current government guidance on matters including self-isolation and reporting the result should be followed.

We have a vaccine now, do we need testing anymore?

Although vaccine rollout is progressing extremely quickly in the UK, the government expects that it will be the end of July 2021 before every adult in the UK has been offered their first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. Second doses should be received around 12 weeks after the first, and so it is likely to be the end of October 2021 before every adult has received both doses.

In the meantime, whilst we await full vaccine rollout, regular rapid antigen testing offers a way to enable the re-opening of society.

Beyond this, it is also important to consider that no vaccine is 100% effective even after 2 doses, that not everyone will accept or be able to have the vaccine, and that there is uncertainty as to whether the vaccines will work effectively against current or future mutations of the virus. We should also consider the fact that the UK is very much ahead of other countries around the world in progressing its vaccine rollout, and that it will still be some time before the vast majority of people globally will be vaccinated.

With these factors in mind, regular testing is likely to play a role in keeping societies safe and open for some time to come.

What is the limit of detection of the KnowNowᵀᴹ Test?

The Limit of Detection (LoD) is the smallest amount of virus in a sample that a given device can consistently detect.

The Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine carried out an analytical study of the KnowNowᵀᴹ test, which determined that the LoD is 500 plaque-forming units per millilitre (PFU/ml). Based on accepted models of viral load in disease progression, this very low LoD suggests that the KnowNow test can detect infected people as early as day 3 to 4 of infection. This is before they become highly infectious, and a day or two earlier than most tests available.

In the absence of a single study that compares the LoD of KnowNowᵀᴹ to that of other tests, it is not possible to do a like-for-like comparison of the LoDs of different lateral flow tests determined by different studies. This is because there wouldn't be parity across cell cultures and strains of the virus used in the different studies. Additionally, it's important to consider that what the KnowNowᵀᴹ test detects is fundamentally different from other tests. KnowNowᵀᴹ is a true infectivity test which looks exclusively for the spike protein only present on active SARS-CoV-2 viruses. Whereas other lateral flow tests detect the nucleocapsid protein encapsulated in the centre of the virus, which can be present whether the virus is active or not.

The PFU/ml measure, as used in the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine KnowNowᵀᴹ analytical study, is a measure of only the number of virus particles capable of forming plaques in a given sample - viral particles that are defective or which fail to infect their target cell will not produce a plaque and so are not counted by this measure. No inference can be made about the relationship of PFU to the overall number of viral particles in the sample, since this will differ from sample to sample.

Since the KnowNow test specifically detects infectious viral particles only, an LoD measured in PFU/ml is an informative and appropriate measure. However, for other lateral flow tests which indiscriminately detect active and inactive viral particles, an LoD referencing PFU/ml is not particularly informative or comparable to the KnowNowᵀᴹ LoD. For example, the sample used to determine LoD may have had a very low PFU/ml, but many inactive viral particles which were detected by the test. Ultimately, other lateral flow tests are not true tests for COVID infectivity, they do not detect only infectious virus like the KnowNowᵀᴹ test does.

If you'd like to read more about this subject, we recommend reading this paper. It argues that the "Limit of Detection matters and directly impacts efforts to identify, control, and contain outbreaks during this pandemic" since "higher LoD are likely to miss nonnegligible fractions of infected individuals." It also makes the case that LoD values for tests should be benchmarked against a universal standard and readily available in the public domain to enable like-for-like comparison of SARS-CoV-2 detection methods.

Who can administer the KnowNowᵀᴹ Test?

So that the KnowNowᵀᴹ Test is used as effectively as possible, it currently needs to be administered by a trained healthcare professional.

A trained healthcare professional is defined by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) in the Target Product Profile for Point of Care SARS-CoV-2 Detection Tests as a professional belonging to one of the 10 health and social care professional bodies that are overseen by the Professional Standards Authority. You can find a list of these professions here.

However, since the KnowNowᵀᴹ Test needs just a saliva sample, it is much easier to administer effectively than other similar tests, and still return highly sensitive results. So we are investigating whether other specially-trained, competent individuals could be approved to administer KnowNow tests as well.

We are also in the process of trialling and seeking approval for a variation of the KnowNowᵀᴹ Test which could be administered by individuals themselves.

Is KnowNowᵀᴹ approved and safe?

The KnowNowᵀᴹ test has been developed to Vatic's stringent standards of quality and safety.

It has undergone the necessary clinical trials and performance tests and has been shown to meet the specific requirements published by the UK's Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).

The KnowNow test has been CE marked for professional use in a healthcare setting and has been registered for use in the UK and the EU.

Is it possible to tell if the test has been carried out incorrectly?

Failed KnowNowᵀᴹ Test Result
Failed KnowNowᵀᴹ Test Result

Yes, it will be very clear if the test has been carried out incorrectly and failed.

If there are no lines at all visible in the KnowNowᵀᴹ device test results window, then the test has failed, and it should be repeated with a new device and a fresh saliva sample.

Had COVID - 19 symptoms in the last 2 days? Apply here to help us make testing accessible to all.